Kickstarted Superhero Comic, BLACK, Opted For Feature Film Treatment

Jeff Robinov's Studio 8 is reportedly advancing efforts to bring Black Mask Studios comic book property, Black, to the big screen. Studio 8's own EVP, Creative, Jon Silk and fellow executive Rishi Rajani are reportedly overseeing the development of the film inspired by the six-issue series.

Described as a cross between X-Men and The Wire, Black is set in a world where Kareem Jenkins, a young man who survives a hail of bullets, discovers he's part of a larger, oppressive conspiracy in a world where only Black people have superpowers. Deadline's exclusive on Thursday briefly highlights the comic by way of its protagonist and millieu.
“The day I got shot changed my life,” Jenkins says in the latest issue with its references to the Black Live Matters movement, the “unjustly incarcerated” and explosive racial tensions. “Not because I got up, but because of all the people who can’t,” the character adds in the Jamal Igle illustrated comic with cover art by Khary Randolph.
The creators, Kwanza Osajyefo - a former Marvel and DC digital editor, and Tim Smith 3, tripled their funding goals upon launching the Kickstarter to fund the comic last February. They are attached as co-producers with Matteo Pizzolo producing the film.

News of the film comes with a growing trend in announcements of new small screen efforts with alt-history narratives now taking shape; Game Of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are developing Confederate for HBO which centers its story on a raft of characters in a version of America now divided following the secession of the South and its ensuing legalization and institution of slavery. At Amazon, Will Packer and Aaron McGruder have their own program in the mix with Black America, set in post-reparations version of the States where New Colonia emerges as Blacks regain the South.

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