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Thursday, February 18, 2016

KING BOXER Poised For A Remake With Brett Ratner Directing


So, how do you feel about the idea of Rush Hour trilogy helmer Brett Ratner remaking a kung fu classic like Cheng Chang-ho's 1972 flick, Five Fingers Of Death a.k.a. King Boxer? Word has it that he's on board to direct the film as well as produce with partner James Packer under their RatPac banner with the assistance of Celestial Pictures who currently have the rights to the entire Shaw Brothers library.
Months before Bruce Lee burst into the international scene with Enter the Dragon, this powerful story of tragedy, torture, redemption, and revenge premiered across America under the unforgettable title Five Fingers Of Death. And, under that title, it went on to become the first international martial arts movie hit, and a perennial best-selling video. It made a continent-spanning star of Lo Lieh, and established the Shaw Brothers as the preeminent studio for high quality action and adventure. Now, finally, after more than thirty years, the original King Boxer takes its rightful place as the film that started it all for the Western world. Not surprisingly, the tale of an honorable fighter's retraining in the "Iron Palm" style after corrupt invaders crush his hands remains as potent and exciting as when it premiered.
There may be a few headlines in the coming years regarding other Shaw titles. For now, this one garners enough interest for chatter as Ratner clearly has an interest in directing another martial arts actioner. He's hung out a time or two with Thai action star Tony Jaa for a time or two in recent years which could be a sign of prospects already brewing for Jaa to headline a Ratner film while Jaa himself continues to spawn a fruitful international career, including films like Skin Trade, Furious Seven and the currently shooting xXx: The Return Of Xander Cage.

But, that's neither here nor there as nothing is official regarding cast names beyond what's been reported this week, although it won't hurt to keep the possibilities in mind. In the meantime, the question is still worth asking: How do you feel about Ratner remaking a Kung Fu classic retooled for contemporary audiences? Do you think he's earned the chops?


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